13 February 2006

6 comments
 
It is truly sad that this lesson could not have been learned before Wilkinson set off to Africa. God, I pray that it actually HAS been learned and that there is time and willingness to turn that program around to still do some good. Here is the article:

The Prayer of Jabez falls short in Africa
by David Batstone [Sojourners]

Bruce Wilkinson, author of the best-selling book The Prayer of Jabez, made a big splash nearly four years ago when he announced his ambitious plan to help children suffering from AIDS in Africa.

Not everything for Wilkinson has gone according to plan, unfortunately. A page one feature in the Dec. 19 The Wall Street Journal captures the sad tale in a nutshell: "In 2002 Bruce Wilkinson, a Georgia preacher whose self-help prayer book had made him a rich man, heard God's call, moved to Africa and announced his intention to save one million children left orphaned by the AIDS epidemic. In October [2005], Wilkinson resigned in a huff from the African charity he founded. He abandoned his plan to house 10,000 children in a facility that was to be an orphanage, bed-and-breakfast, game reserve, Bible college, industrial park and Disneyesque tourist destination in the tiny kingdom of Swaziland. What happened in between is a story of grand hopes and inexperience, divine inspiration and human foibles. His departure left critics convinced he was just another in a long parade of outsiders who have come to Africa making big promises and quit the continent when local people didn't bend to their will."

It is not my aim to gloat at Wilkinson's failure. To the contrary, I mourn what this means for the millions of African children in crisis who apparently will not benefit from his efforts. I also want to honor Wilkinson's desire to help the least fortunate. It would have been easy for him to take the wealth he gained from his book sales and live a life of personal comfort.

This chain of events, however, should not pass without a moment of theological reflection. The "blessed life" that Wilkinson has helped to promote carries with it a number of assumptions about where God is present in the world, and how God acts in response to the prayers of the faithful.

The Prayer of Jabez is based on a passage out of the book of Chronicles, in which a devoted man named Jabez asks God for a favor: "Oh that you would bless me and enlarge my border, and that your hand might be with me, and that you would keep me from hurt and harm!" The fact that God honors Jabez' prayer and blesses him with great riches indicates to Wilkinson a God-principle. If we in pure heart ask God for a blessing - and do so using the very words that Jabez prayed - then God will bring wondrous gifts into our life. As The Wall Street Journal reports, Wilkinson interprets the wild commercial success of his books (roughly 20 million copies sold combined) as yet another proof of the miraculous power of the Jabez prayer. In other words, it worked for Jabez, it worked for Wilkinson, and now it should work for you. With the fiasco in Africa now behind him - and the full Journal report makes clear that fiasco is the appropriate term - I wonder if Wilkinson has reconsidered his theology.

Maybe because I spent so many years in poor regions of the globe I could never accept the prayer-in-blessing-out approach to faithful living. Straight to the point, I have known too many devoted Christians for whom life did not bring them material blessing. Their children still died of infectious diseases that plagued their village. They could not avoid the violence that dictators and ideologues so often use to cow the powerless. Their territory did not expand because their only path for survival was a daily labor with their hands. Yet they did not lose faith, or cease praying for God's blessing.

As I ponder on their lives, I find a more fitting theology for God's presence and action in the world to be laid out in the book of Hebrews. There we are encouraged to have "faith in things not yet seen," and are offered models of individuals who tried to lead devoted lives that honor God. We read that some of them did receive great material blessings, while others ended up in the dens of lions or stoned due to their principled living. We learn, in other words, that God does hear their prayers and loves them profoundly, but it does not always bring them material riches or expanded territory.
Wilkinson's doctrine in fact implies that social structures are immaterial. An individual reciting the right prayer can transcend an AIDS epidemic in his or her village or escape being bought and sold into slavery (like 27 million people on this planet yet today). Perhaps now that Wilkinson has immersed himself in Africa, he better understands that the curse of poverty is not a spiritual punishment, or an indication of a lack of faith. To bring blessings to the orphans and widows of Africa, a dramatic shift in values - political, economic, and personal - will be required. And that challenge cannot be owned by Africans alone; it falls squarely on the shoulders of us in rich nations, who enjoy such great material "blessings."


Just like the next Bible reader, I could pick out individual passages that seem to suggest that God will give us whatever we desire as long as we ask for it with a pure heart. "You can even move this mountain" with such a prayer, as Jesus teaches his disciples in the gospels. I do not summarily discount these passages, nor do I assume that we should never pray for rain in a time of drought.

But the weight of the biblical message balances heavily toward a prayer life that yields courage, love, and compassion to do the will of God. The expectation of material gain and miraculous blessings may even distract us on that pilgrimage. The passage in Hebrews calls us, based on past heroes of the faith, "to run the race in front of us," confident that devoting our lives to God's work is all the reward we will ever need.

6 comments:

adamryan said...

I don't understand. This article doesn't seem to mention what his plans were or how they failed.

Because of that I don't know what lessons can be learned.

chrisflinchbaugh said...

There are no specfics, true. This would be a very long article if there were. I think the fact that this all involved some sort of theme park with all the entrenched corporate interests points to the cluelessness of what is needed. But mainly paragraph eight, which is below, sums up the perspective problem that is so prevelant in our churches and therefore in our hearts. No?

Wilkinson's doctrine in fact implies that social structures are immaterial. An individual reciting the right prayer can transcend an AIDS epidemic in his or her village or escape being bought and sold into slavery (like 27 million people on this planet yet today). Perhaps now that Wilkinson has immersed himself in Africa, he better understands that the curse of poverty is not a spiritual punishment, or an indication of a lack of faith. To bring blessings to the orphans and widows of Africa, a dramatic shift in values - political, economic, and personal - will be required. And that challenge cannot be owned by Africans alone; it falls squarely on the shoulders of us in rich nations, who enjoy such great material "blessings."

chrisflinchbaugh said...

I should say that the nature of any kind of large theme park would have to have entrenched corporate interests even if only in materials but almost certainly in products and perhaps content. Maybe more serious is that we consider what the purpose of spending all that money on a theme park... Why does anyone need a theme park let along someone suffering from HIV/AIDS if not starving as well? Isn't this one more thing driving us to escape from the type of community life that God ordained to give us all the love, joy, rest, and work that we need? Not that a small vacation from time to time is not beneficial but this sort of endeavor, especially considering the original stated intention of saving lives, is quite wrong headed.

k said...

Do you actually think that the point of the article is that Bruce Wilkinson wanted to build a theme park (" entrenched with corporate interests) in Africa and that's why he was unsuccessful? Cause I must have been reading a complete different article if that was the point...

chrisflinchbaugh said...

Haha. No absolutely not. I was just commenting on one aspect of the plan that really missed the mark in regards to what the people in the host country actually need. Also falling into that category would be a game reserve and possibly much of the rest but it's hard to tell with only this article. The main jist of the piece concerned Wilkinson's disregard for cause and effect and his belief that material blessing is (almost always) connected to faithfulness to God. That later being an epidemic in the American evangelical/charismatic church. Hope that clears up my take on this. Nice chatting :)

gotwalt said...

At the risk of linking to christianitytoday, here's a link to christianitytoday with a relatively balanced (albeit brief) overview of what happened.

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2006/003/13.26.html

 
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